review

The Mermaid’s Call by Katherine Stansfield

This is book 14 of the 20 Books Of Summer Challenge, there’s only a week left and I can’t see me reaching 20. Last year I read 14 so I’ll definitely beat that. I’ve been a bit slow reading lately and also blogging, so I’ll update at the beginning of September my final figure. 

I picked this book because I read The Magpie Tree which is the second book in this series last year. This book got my attention from the beginning, mainly because it’s set in Boscastle which is a place I love and miss visiting. 

Cornwall, 1845. Shilly has always felt a connection to happenings that are not of this world, a talent that has proved invaluable when investigating dark deeds with master of disguise, Anna Drake. The women opened a detective agency with help from their newest member and investor, Mathilda, but six long months have passed without a single case to solve and tensions are growing.

It is almost a relief when a man is found dead along the Morwenstow coast and the agency is sought out to investigate. There are suspicions that wreckers plague the shores, luring ships to their ruin with false lights – though nothing has ever been proved. Yet with the local talk of sirens calling victims to the sea to meet their end, could something other-worldly be responsible for the man’s death?

-from Goodreads

My Review

The Mermaid’s Call is book three, you can read it as a stand along but you will always benefit from reading them in order. 

I enjoyed this historical mystery, it was lovely to be back with Anna and Shilly again. Anna and Shilly have recently set up their detective business in Boscastle, they are approached with a strange case. A man has a dream that his brother has been killed, Shilly also has a strange dream and feels this pull of the siren. They go to Morwenstow to investigate. 

I don’t want to give too much away. I like the characters of Anna and Shilly, they are still mysteries themselves, or at least Anna is. The Parson was also an intriguing character and I learnt at the end in the author’s note that he was a real person.

I love the dark, coastal atmosphere of this book.  The mystery was interesting and there was a lot of reference to things from that era, the religion, the story of the wreckers. 

Although I did enjoy this book, SPOILER? it didn’t really follow through with the supernatural element like the previous book did. Unless my expectations were too high? 

However it was  interesting and a lovely dark read and I am definitely going to read the next to find out what happens next for Shilly and Anna. 

review

The Wild Silence by Raynor Winn

It’s been two years since I read and loved Raynor Winn’s first book The Salt Path and I was going to buy the follow up The Wild Silence this year. The publication date had to be changed later in the year, but then I seen it on Netgalley. So thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book. 

The Wild Silence

Nature holds the answers for Raynor and her husband Moth. After walking 630 homeless miles along The Salt Path, living on the windswept and wild English coastline; the cliffs, the sky and the chalky earth now feel like their home.

Moth has a terminal diagnosis, but against all medical odds, he seems revitalized in nature. Together on the wild coastal path, with their feet firmly rooted outdoors, they discover that anything is possible.

Now, life beyond The Salt Path awaits and they come back to four walls, but the sense of home is illusive and returning to normality is proving difficult – until an incredible gesture by someone who reads their story changes everything.

A chance to breathe life back into a beautiful farmhouse nestled deep in the Cornish hills; rewilding the land and returning nature to its hedgerows becomes their saving grace and their new path to follow.

The Wild Silence is a story of hope triumphing over despair, of lifelong love prevailing over everything. It is a luminous account of the human spirit’s instinctive connection to nature, and how vital it is for us all.”- GoodReads

My Review

This book starts by telling us what happened after Mo and Ray left the coast path, Moth is doing a degree and Ray’s mother is ill. She’s not doing too great being back in the normal world and things are starting to go back to the way they were before they went: Mo’s health is deteriorating and Ray feels she’s lost what she gained on the path.

Ray starts to think about her childhood and then we’re right there with her as she remembers how she’s always felt this tie to the land, this longing to be outside and to be connected to everything. The style is as exquisite as the first book. Her story is heart-breakingly sad and it’s hard to find the right words when it’s someone’s life. 

 I found some of Ray’s feelings about nature and her reticence towards people striking a chord within me. Feeling raw from the sad events in her life it all cut me to the quick. Things are difficult for them, Ray trying to get a job and then she realises Moth has forgotten their time on the coast path. So she has an idea to start writing a book about their experiences to help Moth remember and starts telling us how The Salt Path came to be written. 

The Salt Path is a beautiful book that was written especially for Moth so he wouldn’t forget, a way of keeping that time frozen for them. The story was so wonderful it had to be published. 

 I enjoyed this book but I read it too quickly. I should’ve waited to read it when the hardback became released, some books are enjoyed better when their actually in your hands. It was good to read what happened next and also read about how The Salt Path came to be. 

 

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This book is expected to be published 3rd September 2020 but you can get The Salt Path now, I recommend it.